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BusyBee

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About BusyBee

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday February 2

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Van Buren, Ohio
  • Interests
    All things fish... Plants... Woodworking...

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  1. SaltwaterAquarium.com also still has (10 in stock) of the NEW TO MARKET... ChaetoMax Macroalgae-Specific LED Light - Innovative Marine Lights... Sale priced at $59.49... If any ones looking. They're sold out at all the other retailers except Dr. Foster and Smith. (They have them listed, but at full price.) https://www.saltwateraquarium.com/chaetomax-macroalgae-specific-led-light-innovative-marine/
  2. SaltwaterAquarium.com has ReefRack 50 Coral Frag Rack (*OPEN BOX*) - Innovative Marine Racks... (23 in stock) priced at $29.00 BUT... If you enter the word "SOLD" in the coupon / promo box at check out you'll get an additional 20% OFF with free shipping to TOTAL... $23.20... I didn't think that was to bad. https://www.saltwateraquarium.com/reefrack-50-coral-frag-rack-open-box-innovative-marine/
  3. Well... I'll give it a go, see how it works.
  4. What's a Broken image?
  5. I just bought a new LED and wondered if anyone has any experience... Good... Bad... In hindsight it would have been better to ask before I bought it. I've been disappointed before...
  6. I always get my projects done, just don't like to rush.
  7. Thanks... But I'm not done with the project, just yet. I still have a stand / base, cover plate and canopy to construct. I'm not certain on the hours invested. I like to have multiple projects going at any given time and switch around from project to project depending on my free time and possibly the weather / work environment. I cut the molds, for the 3-D scape, last winter. It was to cold, at that time, to form fiberglass, outside... So, it sat for a spell. When the weather warmed up, I worked on it off and on to this point. I just keep plugging away at it. (I am also in the midst of a bathroom remodel. Since... I tore out the walls and floor down to the studs last spring. I was up until midnight last night working on grout.)
  8. Thanks... My husband wanted me to color the rocks like slate... I thought the red / brown tones would look better with green plants. However, for a reef tank... I think non-glazed ceramic would look best. The whitish look would mimic live rock especially after some establishing time had passed, while the porosity would be good for bacteria colonization. And... You could form the raw clay into whatever you wanted. Plus, you could add color to the clay while still in the "green" stages without glaze prior to firing.
  9. Thanks... I haven't decided on the fish, yet. First... I must finish the project.
  10. Thanks... It's coming along.
  11. Hello all... Just moving my posts, that started out in "Deals" and got off topic to my 3-D Tank Background... Here. (I hope this is the right spot.) Sorry... I didn't take pictures of the build start, maybe next time. And... I'm not on here all the time, in fact days and weeks can to by. (I don't get projects done, when on the computer all the time. And... Well, I admit it... I'm not real social.) At any rate, here is a recap of how the background and foreground pieces are made... I make the 3D scapes out of fiberglass. (A little different from any I've ever seen posted on You Tube...) I reverse cut the scape, mold style, out of styrofoam. The only You Tube videos I've ever seen show people making forms out of styrofoam then coating them with fiberglass material and removing the styrofoam middle later. I tried this once just to see how it worked and found the finished product lacking in detail. (Of course, I've been accused of being a perfectionist... Just depends how picky you are...) Back to my way... Hope I'm not confusing you... I reverse cut a mold from styrofoam. If your styrofoam didn't start out as one piece, seal the edges before you proceed... If your making a 360 degree shape like a rock, say for the foreground, you'll have at least two pieces to fuse with a pore hole. If your making a 3D background for the rear wall you should have a reverse cut flat panel with edges all around. I like to reverse cut the full panel... Then add the edges later... I don't pour the entire piece at one time but work in layers over multiple days. (Make sure you wear breathing gear anytime you work with fiberglass. I would suggest gloves, too.) I use a two part, fish safe, fiberglass resin / epoxy and of coarse fiberglass material. (Can also be used to seal plywood aquariums.) I start with the layers of fiberglass resin and CHOPPED STRANDS of fiberglass material. I layer this until I'm away from the detail and can use a flat, level piece of material across the back. You can make it as heavy, thick or thin as you want. However, if you want any kind of hollowed out area behind the 3D background, other alterations will need to be made to the mold prior to pouring or during the layering process. When you're all done with the pouring and the fiberglass is fully cured, remove the styrofoam mold. You can't save it for reuse... It's a once and done mold. It's going to come off in chunks. Get as much off as you can, then use acetone and a brush to remove the rest... The piece will have rough areas and edges. (No styrofoam mold is perfect.) You'll need a dremel or similar tool... (I use a dremel.) Grind down or off any rough edges, areas you don't like or want... Get it just the way you want and make sure it fits properly... Now is the time to make adjustments if need be... This takes some TIME, very time consuming... The next step is to paint you creation. (I have one in the painting stage now...) After the painting is done, seal the piece with one or two thin coats of resin, brushed on. Install in the tank... I just finished painting the back and foreground pieces, used both paint brushes and my airbrush for fine detail, with multiple layers of color. (Personal Note: I decided to use red and brown rock tones. For what I have planned with the stand and canopy... I believe it will look the best. However, my husband didn't like the rock color, thought they should be gray. To bad... Here are some pictures of the pieces... They aren't going in a saltwater tank, but a low tech nano plant tank. I am working on the rock work for a reef tank, but that's another listing. Quote
  12. I don't sell my work... takes to long to complete. And... I don't like to rush.
  13. I haven't been on in awhile. This tank's not finished, yet. I'm working on the base and canopy. Here are some pictures of the background and foreground pieces... I colored them with red / browns instead of gray tones. Thought it would look better... My husband didn't like it.
  14. I make the 3D scapes out of fiberglass. (A little different from any I've ever seen posted on You Tube...) I reverse cut the scape, mold style, out of styrofoam. The only You Tube videos I've ever seen show people making forms out of styrofoam then coating them with fiberglass material and removing the styrofoam middle later. I tried this once just to see how it worked and found the finished product lacking in detail. (Of course, I've been accused of being a perfectionist... Just depends how picky you are...) Back to my way... Hope I'm not confusing you... I reverse cut a mold from styrofoam. If your styrofoam didn't start out as one piece, seal the edges before you proceed... If your making a 360 degree shape like a rock, say for the foreground, you'll have at least two pieces to fuse with a pore hole. If your making a 3D background for the rear wall you should have a reverse cut flat panel with edges all around. I like to reverse cut the full panel... Then add the edges later... I don't pour the entire piece at one time but work in layers over multiple days. (Make sure you wear breathing gear anytime you work with fiberglass. I would suggest gloves, too.) I use a two part, fish safe, fiberglass resin / epoxy and of coarse fiberglass material. (Can also be used to seal plywood aquariums.) I start with the layers of fiberglass resin and CHOPPED STRANDS of fiberglass material. I layer this until I'm away from the detail and can use a flat, level piece of material across the back. You can make it as heavy, thick or thin as you want. However, if you want any kind of hollowed out area behind the 3D background, other alterations will need to be made to the mold prior to pouring or during the layering process. When you're all done with the pouring and the fiberglass is fully cured, remove the styrofoam mold. You can't save it for reuse... It's a once and done mold. It's going to come off in chunks. Get as much off as you can, then use acetone and a brush to remove the rest... The piece will have rough areas and edges. (No styrofoam mold is perfect.) You'll need a dremel or similar tool... (I use a dremel.) Grind down or off any rough edges, areas you don't like or want... Get it just the way you want and make sure it fits properly... Now is the time to make adjustments if need be... This takes some TIME, very time consuming... The next step is to paint you creation. (I have one in the painting stage now...) After the painting is done, seal the piece with one or two thin coats of resin, brushed on. Install in the tank...
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