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Deciding that I would like to remodel. Created some great swim through and places for everyone to chill. However both my foxface and sailfin can hide at the same time in the big one. Additionally my BTA have taken over most of the prime coral locations. Honestly, my newbie aquascape could have been a lot better. I did a great job setting up a healthy space for the fish (10/10),  flow (7/10), coral placement (3/10), visual appeal (5/10). Let's be honest, this is about having a great visual and healthy environment for our pets.

 

I don't want to start another cycle and harm anybody. There is more rock than needed from 2 large structures and additional in the sump. Going to redo one side and thinking this may be a multi-week build and truly gluing and mortaring everything together.

Option 1:

Start with all new dry rock to build. Will be able to keep all the fish and coral happy in their normal routine with only 1 change. Easily move current rock into the sump/other parts of the tank to prevent any new cycle.

Option 2:

I have some really nice pieces (yes I am referring to rocks as nice pieces) that I don't want to banish to the sump. Really want to do a small rescape to pull these pieces out. Going out of town next week and would let these pieces die out. Then a couple weeks of the build for die off and trying to clean up the rock. This will certainly create another cycle as I won't get it completely clean. Thinking it's about 20 pounds of the 150 pounds of rock and I also have a sandbed. Again, when placing new structure I would put the current display rock into sump.

Question 1:

Is there a specific number of dry rock that can be added to a system (either option 1 or 2)?

Question 2:

If I have they hybrid rock structure from option 2 is there a number that I should be aiming for? 

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I think it all depends on how clean the new rock is.  If you set that rock up with heat and flow in a trash can or other tank you can precycle it with less interruption and monitor it for leaching nutrients.  I added a hundred pounds or so of dry pukani to a system with roughly 300 pounds of rock already in it and spent 2 years dealing with the mess.  Lesson learned for me, I will always pre cure even synthetic rock from now on!  If I were in your shoes I would pre cure offline, then add to sump, let things settle, and then do whatever you want Without worry.

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4 hours ago, Muttley000 said:

I think it all depends on how clean the new rock is.  If you set that rock up with heat and flow in a trash can or other tank you can precycle it with less interruption and monitor it for leaching nutrients.  I added a hundred pounds or so of dry pukani to a system with roughly 300 pounds of rock already in it and spent 2 years dealing with the mess.  Lesson learned for me, I will always pre cure even synthetic rock from now on!  If I were in your shoes I would pre cure offline, then add to sump, let things settle, and then do whatever you want Without worry.

I like it and was thinking of using a tub to cycle for a couple weeks before adding. Thanks

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  • 1 month later...
On 10/16/2020 at 5:54 AM, Muttley000 said:

Those look really good!  What did you end up using to fasten them?

I used superglue and mortar. Some of the extreme weight angles got acrylic pole assists. However I found that putting on superglue and then pushing a small amount of mortar into the same crevasse made for a solid hold. The mortar really provides the strength, but as it dries I feel it might shrink a small amount. The superglue provides the hold, but doesn't have the strength. Working the 2 products at the same time proved to be a great option.

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On 10/20/2020 at 10:40 AM, Biecacka said:

How long will the mortar have to cure?

 

corey

I was generally giving it 24 hours before putting any stress on it. The glue/mortar combination would have support within 5 minutes, but I didn't want to stress it. I learned on this piece trying to add after 4-5 hours it still wasn't strong enough to support a suspended weight.image.png.70da391f7cb3c276878f7058a4c3a84c.png

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The mortar and glue were able to cure in either situation. I put these together outside of the tank and then put them in a tub to cycle. I am certain it continued to cure and harden even more. This way it is cycled before entering the tank and the bonds are even stronger so when I lift it into the tank it doens't come crashing apart.

I know concrete can take over 1 year to fully cure... even longer in wet situations.

Edited by Flounder
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